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TIME TO SEE OPENS IN NEW ZEALAND FOR LANDMARK TOUR

Posted 22/11/2016

In the latest in its tour of the Commonwealth, Time to See has travelled to New Zealand where a private preview of the exhibition will be held at Government House before going on display to the public in Auckland and Wellington.

Time to See features the work of five award winning photographers who visited seven countries where The Queen Elizabeth Diamond Jubilee Trust and Standard Chartered are funding projects to prevent avoidable blindness.

The exhibition has been viewed by Her Majesty The Queen and Commonwealth Heads of Government at the meeting in Malta. It has also travelled to Sydney for the annual meeting of GET2020 (Global Elimination of Trachoma by 2020) and has appeared in the Palace of Westminster in London.

On 23 November, Time to See will be launched in New Zealand at Government House by Governor General, Dame Patsy Reddy. Guests will include the High Commissions of Fiji, Pakistan, Australia, Cook Islands, Somoa, Solomon Islands and Niue.

The exhibition will then be open to the public at two locations in New Zealand: Britomart, Auckland from 28 November until 4 December and then it will travel to Wellington Central Library and be on display from 6 December until 21 December.

Amongst the programmes depicted the exhibition includes images from the diabetic retinopathy programme in Fiji implemented by the Fred Hollows Foundation New Zealand.

In 2015, the Trust awarded £1.5m in grant funding to The Fred Hollows Foundation, for its partner The Fred Hollows Foundation NZ to work in partnership with local organisations and government institutions in the Pacific Island Nations of Fiji, Kiribati, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga and Vanuatu to prevent blindness from diabetes.

Diabetes is becoming a global epidemic, and with it comes the risk of blindness. Of the ten countries with the highest prevalence of diabetes in the world, seven are located in the Pacific. Despite the fact that by 2030 rates of diabetes are predicted to increase by 54%, there is expected to be a growth of only 2% in the number of ophthalmologists globally. Diabetic retinopathy is therefore predicted to become the leading cause of blindness by 2030. To combat this escalating problem, the Trust’s Diabetic Retinopathy Initiative is working in the Pacific to build local capacity by training health professionals, providing equipment and improving infrastructure, thereby improving access to screening services and referral systems. The Initiative also aims to raise public awareness of diabetic retinopathy and the need for regular eye screening by strengthening health promotion policies.

Four out of five people who are blind don’t need to be.

It is Time to See.

Major international exhibition in Sydney to highlight avoidable blindness

Posted 27/04/2016

An exhibition featuring the work of five award-winning photojournalists will highlight the issue of avoidable blindness as part of an international meeting on the blinding eye disease trachoma.

The Queen Elizabeth Diamond Jubilee Trust’s “Time to See” exhibition was officially launched last November at the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting in Malta and has been viewed by Her Majesty The Queen and His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales, as well as Heads of Commonwealth Governments.

It has now arrived in Sydney and is on display in conjunction with the annual meeting of GET2020 (Global Elimination of Trachoma by 2020).

Global experts attending the conference will be tackling the issue of trachoma head on with less than four years to reach the elimination target.

The exhibition will be launched by The Queen Elizabeth Diamond Jubilee Trust Australian Representative and Executive Chairman The Hon Major General Michael Jeffery AC, AO (Mil), CVO, MC (Retd).

Major General Jeffery said,
"All of us involved in celebrating Her Majesty The Queen's outstanding 60 years tenure as Head of the Commonwealth, by expediting the elimination of preventable blindness world-wide, through the auspices of The Queen Elizabeth Diamond Jubilee Trust, have been delighted with progress to date, including in remote Aboriginal communities of Australia."

As part of a programme to eliminate blinding trachoma, The Queen Elizabeth Diamond Jubilee Trust is working with the Government of Australia, Vision 2020 Australia, the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, The Fred Hollows Foundation and the University of Melbourne Indigenous Eye Health Unit to promote face washing and hygiene in community locations such as schools, childcare centres and sports clubs.

Time To See aims to bring to the attention of the Commonwealth and the world the impact of avoidable blindness, and the solutions available to end it.

Five multi-award winning photojournalists – Ashley Gilbertson, Poulomi Basu, Sam Faulkner, Andrew Quilty, and Adam Ferguson – visited seven countries across the Commonwealth to document the impact avoidable blindness can have on people and communities and the efforts to address it.

Forty-one of the images from the exhibition have been brought to Australia. These comprise: 11 trachoma images from Australia’s Yalata and Utju communities, four images from Fiji, 13 from Kenya, four from India, two from Uganda, five from Pakistan and three from Nigeria.

The photos highlight eye conditions including trachoma, retinopathy of prematurity, diabetic retinopathy and childhood blindness.

Time To See Exhibition Displayed At The Palace Of Westminster

Posted 12/01/2016

Yesterday, at the Palace of Westminster, the Time To See exhibition was put on display in the Upper Waiting Hall situated off the Committee Corridor. It will stay on display until the 15th of January.

The exhibition was officially launched in November 2015 at the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting in Malta and has been viewed by Her Majesty The Queen and His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales, as well as Heads of Commonwealth Governments.

Time To See aims to bring to the attention of the Commonwealth and the world the impact of avoidable blindness, and the solutions readily available to end it. Five multi-award winning photojournalists – Ashley Gilbertson, Poulomi Basu, Sam Faulkner, Andrew Quilty, and Adam Ferguson – visited seven countries across the Commonwealth – Australia, Fiji, India, Kenya, Nigeria, Pakistan, and Uganda – to document the impact completely avoidable forms of blindness are having on people and communities plus the work being carried out to end it.

Time to See shows Commonwealth Heads of Government the impact of avoidable blindness

Posted 25/11/2015

As Commonwealth Heads of Government convene in Malta this weekend they will be presented with images from landmark photography exhibition, Time to See.

The exhibition, which was privately viewed by Her Majesty The Queen and His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales at a preview at St James’s Palace, aims to bring to the attention of the Commonwealth and the world the impact of avoidable blindness, and the solutions readily available to end it. There are 98 million people in the Commonwealth today who are blind or have low vision, yet four out of five needn’t be. There are straightforward, known solutions to prevent avoidable blindness that can make an incalculable difference to the lives of millions of individuals and families who are unnecessarily affected.

Five multi-award winning photojournalists, Ashley Gilbertson, Poulomi Basu, Sam Faulkner, Andrew Quilty and Adam Ferguson, visited seven countries across the Commonwealth - Australia, Fiji, India, Kenya, Nigeria, Pakistan and Uganda - to document the impact completely avoidable forms of blindness are having on people and communities.

Time to See highlights work that The Queen Elizabeth Diamond Jubilee Trust and Standard Chartered are supporting to prevent avoidable blindness.

Dr Astrid Bonfield CBE, Chief Executive of The Queen Elizabeth Diamond Jubilee said,

“To be able to present these impactful images to Commonwealth Heads of Government and their delegations is an incredible opportunity. Time to See demonstrates the unparalleled work that our partners are delivering across the Commonwealth to save the sight of millions. Bringing the exhibition to CHOGM will help raise the awareness of the largely unknown reality that with today’s knowledge 80% of blindness is avoidable, and that the solutions are simple and affordable. We hope that these striking images, taken by of some of the Commonwealth’s leading photographers, will harness the awareness and further support of others to help us achieve the ultimate goal of ending avoidable blindness across the Commonwealth.”

The exhibition will tour the Commonwealth throughout 2016.

The Queen presented with photographs from Time to See

Posted 19/11/2015

Today, at a Commonwealth reception held at St James’s Palace, Her Majesty The Queen and His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales were presented with images taken from the landmark photography exhibition, Time to See.

Time to See aims to bring to the attention of the Commonwealth and the world the impact of avoidable blindness, and the solutions readily available to end it. There are 98 million people in the Commonwealth today who are blind or have low vision, yet four out of five needn’t be. There are straightforward, known solutions that can make an incalculable difference to the lives of millions of individuals and families who are unnecessarily affected.

Five multi-award winning photojournalists, Ashley Gilbertson, Poulomi Basu, Sam Faulkner, Andrew Quilty and Adam Ferguson, visited seven countries across the Commonwealth - Australia, Fiji, India, Kenya, Nigeria, Pakistan and Uganda - to document the impact completely avoidable forms of blindness are having on people and communities.

Time to See highlights work that The Queen Elizabeth Diamond Jubilee Trust and Standard Chartered are developing and supporting to prevent avoidable blindness.

Dr Astrid Bonfield CBE, Chief Executive of The Queen Elizabeth Diamond Jubilee said,

“We are honoured to have been given this opportunity to present images from our exhibition Time to See to Her Majesty The Queen and His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales. Time to See demonstrates the incredible work that our partners are delivering across the Commonwealth to save the sight of millions. The sad, and often unknown reality is that 80% of blindness is avoidable, and we hope that these striking images, taken by of some of the Commonwealth’s leading photographers, will harness the awareness and further support of others to help us achieve our ultimate goal of ending avoidable blindness across the Commonwealth.”

The full exhibition will be on display at the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting (CHOGM) in Valletta, Malta from 26th to 28th November 2015, where The Queen and The Prince of Wales will also be present.